Technical details
Open Accordion
Size + fit
Open Accordion

Fit guide: The Lumbershirt has a regular fit.

Model wears: Skier, surfer and mountain biker Niko Ohlsson is 5ft 11 / 180cm with a 38in / 97cm chest and a 32in / 81cm waist. Niko has an athletic build and is wearing the Lumbershirt in size Medium.

Personalised advice: See our size guide for more advice on sizing, or you can ask us for personalised sizing advice here.

Returns and exchanges: Don’t worry if you order something and it doesn’t fit – we have a free, no hassle 30 day return and exchange period.

XSSMLXLXXL
Fits chest83-9091-9899-106107-114115-122123-130
Fits waist71-7676-8181-8686-9191-9696-101
XSSMLXLXXL
Fits chest33-3636-3939-4242-4545-4848-51
Fits waist28-3030-3232-3434-3636-3838-40
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Lumbershirt

A new breed of men emerged from the forest

Out of the forests came a breed of men who worked high, played big and lived hard. Treetop daredevils as great as the great outdoors and some of the hardest men who ever lived. A few passed into folklore. Jigger Johnson, the woodsman from Maine, who could reportedly kick knots off frozen logs using his bare feet. Big Joe Mufferaw, from Montreal, who took out Canada’s reigning boxing champ with a single punch, having slipped into the ring from the audience, aged 16. And the mythical woodsman Paul Bunyan, whose likeness is today displayed in giant statues across North America, usually accompanied by his trusty companion Babe the Blue Ox – who has five states still laying claim to his birthplace.

Lumbershirt

They were Kings of the Woods

These ‘kings of the woods’ developed their own language. A “bucker” was someone who cut trees into manageable pieces after they’d been chopped down by the “feller”, while the “whistle punk” relayed information between the worksite and the area where logs were dragged for loading. Some high-climbers developed a flair for performance. When they topped a tree they would ceremoniously take a pinch of snuff, roll a cigarette or stand on their heads.

Lumbershirt

They needed new clothes for dangerous work

Original woodsmen faced the kind of dangers you’d normally only find in nightmares. Falling from 300ft, burning to death, or being crushed by runaway logs. So it helped if their outerwear was bright and visible through thick forest, like the classic red and black buffalo plaid we associate with lumberjacks. Offering durability, affordability and warmth, their shirts became the uniform of America’s working man, and inspired similarly tough garments later adopted by railroad workers and Civil war soldiers. Thanks to its associations with construction and frontiersmen, the lumberjack shirt became shorthand for masculinity and strength.

Lumbershirt

An iconic shirt was born

In the September 1894 edition of Munsey’s Magazine, one lumberjack explained exactly why a lumberjack’s most important possession was their shirt. “It’s a life fraught with many dangers. Falling trees and rolling logs have caused a long list of deaths; and it is on this account that the woodman’s outer garments are of the brightest colours, blue, green, red, and yellow being the more prominent. The men are thereby able to see one another more distinctly through the thick underbrush, and by a timely warning avert a great many dangers.”

Lumbershirt

We’ve built our toughest shirt yet

We already make shirts to cope with the most demanding conditions on Earth. Our Equator Shirt is made with a rare silk-like cotton from the Nile Delta and is designed to keep you cool in the hottest and most humid places on the planet. And our Planet Earth Shirt is built with an engineered cotton blend that’s designed to work everywhere from the jungles to the city – with hidden vents, an anti-mosquito collar, and built-in air-con. But the Lumbershirt is our toughest shirt yet. 170 years since it first appeared we’ve taken the lumberjack’s default uniform and rebuilt our own high-strength version.

Lumbershirt

We’ve built 2 different types of Lumbershirt

To make the toughest shirt we’ve ever built, we’ve designed two different types of Lumbershirt with two different methods. One is made from a super-tough breed of cotton that was used to make the wings on the Wright Brothers’ planes. The other is built from chambray – the material that gave us the phrase “blue collar worker,” after it was adopted by labourers across the US in the early 20th century. And we’ve blended that with ultra-tough Cordura. Both methods make the Lumbershirt a phenomenally hardwearing outer layer.

Lumbershirt

Made from the same cotton the Wright brothers used

Cotton has been cultivated for more than 5,000 years, but not all cottons are the same. The fine strands that make up a raw piece of cotton are called staples, and the longer these strands are, the stronger and silkier the cotton will be. The type we use for this shirt is called ‘long staple’ cotton. It’s so durable it used to be used in car tyres. It was also used by the early aviation pioneers like the Wright brothers and Otto Lilienthal to build the wings of their planes, before the development of more powerful engines forced the move to aluminium.

Lumbershirt

Engineered in Japan to make it even stronger

Lumberjacks needed their uniforms to be hard-wearing enough to take on life in the forest, but also soft enough to wear sleeping in damp wooden huts for months at a time. So we turn raw cotton into fabric with the help of an advanced Japanese mill. After spinning the cotton they weave it into a dense twill to make it even stronger. The cotton’s long staples mean there are fewer edges when the fibres are woven into fabric, because there are fewer strands. And the result is a material that’s really soft but really strong.

Lumbershirt

Every shirt balances strength and comfort

High strength cotton comes into its own when it’s too hot outside for a jacket, but you still want something really hardwearing. The organic long staple cotton we use is what makes the shirt comfortable and strong at the same time. Each shirt is also put through a pre-washing process to make it feel lived-in from day one. And the more you wear it, the more the material will mould to the shape of your body. It makes the shirt tough enough for any environment, from exploring the four billion hectares of forest on the planet, navigating new cities, or working overtime in the office.

Lumbershirt

You need tough clothes for a hard life

With few regulations and a free-for-all mentality, the logging trade was incredibly dangerous. The men lived in isolated camps with little or no access to water, warm meals or fresh clothes. The hours were long, the work itinerant and the accommodation rough. They worked by kerosene lamp, from “can see to can’t see”. They travelled from camp to camp, and job to job to earn a living, risking injury and death on the way. So whether you’re working in hostile and unpredictable environments, or just the daily grind, our Lumbershirt is designed to have your back.

Lumbershirt

We triple-stitch it

Every Lumbershirt uses over 25 metres of super-thick thread. It’s constructed with triple chain stitched seams in the critical areas of wear and stress like the side and shoulder seams, as well as the arm and yoke seams. Instead of one line of thread you have three lines stitched right next to each other so it won’t snap like a conventional straight stitch can. It’s a technique usually found in heavy vintage denim and chore jacket manufacturing to create stronger clothes. We also use heavy-duty zig zag stitching to strengthen the collar, so it will hold its shape even if it’s drenched.

Lumbershirt

Four chest pockets

You’ll find four chest pockets to carry essentials like your phone, wallet, passport or keys. There are two concealed pockets that open up at the side. They’re protected by storm flaps and fitted with lockable zippers. And there are two more button up pockets that we’ve built over them.

Lumbershirt

Impact-resistant buttons made from corozo nuts

Every button on the shirt starts life as a corozo nut buried inside the spiky fruit of the Tagua Palm trees found on the coastal mountain ranges of South America. Corozo is phenomenally strong so can be carved with stunning precision. It’s highly resistant to scratches, extreme temperatures and impact, so won’t crack or splinter.

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